Managing Invasive Blackberry with Fall-Applied Herbicides

Managing Invasive Blackberry with Fall-Applied Herbicides

The USDA Plants database lists more than 20 Rubus species (and associated hybrids) that were introduced to North America. Himalayan blackberry (Rubus armeniacus) and cutleaf blackberry (Rubus laciniatus) are the two most widespread of the invasive blackberry species.

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Identification and Management of Field Scabious

Identification and Management of Field Scabious

Field scabious or blue-button (Knautia arvensis) is native to Europe, The plant was likely introduced to North America as an ornamental and is currently established in northern tier states in the U.S. and in southern Canadian provinces. Read about identification and management of this plant.

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Tips for Managing Undesirable Brush and Vines in Fall, Winter, and Early Spring

Tips for Managing Undesirable Brush and Vines in Fall, Winter, and Early Spring

Undesirable or invasive woody vegetation threatens the biology and ecology of prairie grasslands and native woodlands. Removing invading woody species can be accomplished year-long, with fall, winter and early spring herbicide applications, extending your vegetation management efforts.

 

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Fall Herbicide Applications to Control Key Invasive Weeds

Fall Herbicide Applications to Control Key Invasive Weeds

Fall is an excellent time to control invasive weeds with Milestone. Late summer and fall rains in many areas of the Central Plains and the West will provide land managers with a good opportunity to extend their application season.

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Effectiveness of Herbicides Applied Mid-Summer or Fall on Canada Thistle Control

Effectiveness of Herbicides Applied Mid-Summer or Fall on Canada Thistle Control

Field studies were established on Canada thistle in several states in the upper Midwest to measure effectiveness of herbicides applied at various application times including mid-summer and fall. Milestone® herbicide at 5 and 7 fluid ounces per acre (fl oz/A) was applied at various growth stages from May through early November.

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Eradicating Oriental Bittersweet in Southeastern Minnesota

Eradicating Oriental Bittersweet in Southeastern Minnesota

A group of committed biologists, conservationists and volunteers are tackling oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), an invasive woody vine that alters ecosystems and impacts property values. Read how education and outreach efforts are key to eradication efforts

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Oriental Bittersweet Identification and Management

Oriental Bittersweet Identification and Management

Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) is native to Korea, China, and Japan. It is naturalized in much of the eastern half of the United States and in Ontario and Quebec Canada. Read about identification and management of this invasive woody vine.

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Identification & Management of Purple Loosestrife

Identification & Management of Purple Loosestrife

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) is a perennial, rhizomatous forb that invades riparian areas and other waterways throughout most of the U.S. and southern Canada  The invasive plant threatens biodiversity of wetlands. Successful management requires integrating various management methods.

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Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Fall is an excellent time to control invasive weeds with herbicides. Late summer and fall rains provide land managers with a good opportunity to extend their application season. 

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Long-term Control of Crown Vetch at a Wisconsin Wildlife Refuge

Long-term Control of Crown Vetch at a Wisconsin Wildlife Refuge

This article reviews results of field trials conducted on a crown vetch infestation in the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge in Wisconsin. Eight years following herbicide application control remained greater than 85%.

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Managing Black Locust in Natural Areas

Managing Black Locust in Natural Areas

Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is difficult to control once established outside its native range. The tree is currently naturalized throughout much of the United States,. This article describes effective management methods for this invasive woody tree.

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Managing Cocklebur in Natural Areas

Managing Cocklebur in Natural Areas

Common or “rough” cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.) is a native, tap rooted, annual broadleaf weed. The plant is a prolific seed producer that spreads easily because of its bur-like seed head. Management of the plant is described.

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What's the Most Poisonous Plant in North America?

What's the Most Poisonous Plant in North America?

The carrot (Apiaceae) family comprises 434 genera and about 3,700 species and is characterized by a flat-topped flower cluster, called an umbel. Water hemlock (Cicuta), one of several toxic members of this family, is considered to be the most toxic plant in North America. There are four species of water hemlock in North America, all highly poisonous and native to North America: spotted (C. maculata), western (C. douglasii), bulblet-bearing (C. bulbifera), and Mackenzie’s (C. virosa).

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Controlling Tansy Ragwort in Natural Areas

Controlling Tansy Ragwort in Natural Areas

Tansy ragwort (Senecio jacobaea) is a winter annual, biennial, or short-lived perennial plant in the sunflower family. The plant is classified as a noxious weed in seven western states (AZ, OR, WA, CA, MT, CO and ID), two eastern states (CT and MA), and Canadian provinces.The invasive plant is well suited to disturbed sites such as roadsides, open forests, logged areas, burned sites, and over-grazed meadows and pastures.  Read tips and recommendations for managing tansy ragwort in natural areas.

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