Secondary Invasion and Reinvasion after Russian-Olive Removal and Revegetation

Russian-Olive-Fruit.jpg

Erin K. Espeland, Jennifer M. Muscha, Joseph Scianna, Robert Kilian, Natalie M. West, and Mark K. Petersen. Invasive Plant Science and Management October-December 2017 Vol. 10, No0. 4: 340-349.

Cut-stump application of triclopyr provided 96% control of Russian olive the year following treatment.  Seeded native species did not have trouble establishing once adequate spring moisture occurred in the second growing season after Russian-olive removal, indicating that removal did not present substantial obstacles to successful revegetation. Follow-up control of Russian-olive is critical after initial treatment. [ READ FULL ABSTRACT. ]

Plains Cottonwood’s Last Stand: Can It Survive Invasion of Russian Olive onto the Milk River, Montana Floodplain?

 www.mt.nrcs.usda.gov

www.mt.nrcs.usda.gov

Pearce and Smith. 2001. Environmental Management Vol. 28, No. 5, pp. 623–637

The eventual replacement of native plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides) forests by Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) is a serious threat to biodiversity on floodplains in western North America. Low palatability  of Russian olive saplings and trees, easily dispersed seed, and three-year seed viability give Russian olive a competitive advantage over native woody riparian plants. Read entire article here.

Revegetation 4 Years After Russian Olive Removal Along the Yellowstone River in Eastern Montana

By: J. M. Muscha, M. K. Petersen,   R. W. Kilian, J. D. Scianna, and E. K. Espeland

RussianOliveCropped.jpg

Many riparian areas along the Yellowstone River and other rivers in the West have converted to dense Russian olive stands, reducing agricultural and ecological value of these lands.  A study was initiated in 2010 along the Yellowstone River in Montana to determine if restoration was necessary following Russian olive removal, and then establish the effectiveness of four restoration strategies.  Results of the study after four years indicate that herbaceous seeding with planted shrubs had the lowest cover of invasive annual grass.  Native species are continuing to establish at the site, and seeded herbaceous species cover is continuing to increase over time. 

READ MORE DETAILS REGARDING STUDY METHODS AND RESULTS. 

Cattle Grazing Effects on Phragmites australis in Nebraska

phragmites-bugwood-thumb.jpg

Authors: Jerry D. Volesky, Stephen L. Young, and Karla H. Jenkins (2016) Invasive Plant Science and Management: April-June 2016, Vol. 9, No. 2, pp. 121-127.
Phragmites australis (common reed) is a widely established invasive plant in wetlands and riparian areas. A three-year study was initiated in Nebraska to evaluate targeted cattle grazing, herbicide effects, and the nutritive value of this species. Results suggest that cattle will utilize Phragmites, and the cumulative effect of grazing has the potential to reduce P. australis populations. However, other methods would have to be used for greater control and site restoration. READ FULL PAPER.

Managed Pollinator Protection Plan Status

Managed Pollinator Protection Plan Status

The Pollinator Protection Initiative Task Force charged the Environmental Protection Agency to identify a process to evaluate the impact of pesticides on pollinators, develop plans to manage pollinators and enhance pollinator habitat. As a result, the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture began developing State Managed Pollinator Protection Plans (MP3). 

Read More

First report: spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe) resistance to auxinic herbicides

Spotted knapweed is a prohibited noxious weed that is primarily controlled with auxinic herbicides. A population collected from a managed rangeland in East Kootenay, BC, was highly resistant to both clopyralid and picloram, with R/S ratios of >25 600 and 28, respectively. This is the first report of resistance in spotted knapweed.

Read More

Is e-commerce trade accelerating invasive plant invasion and impacting the world’s ecosystems?

Is e-commerce trade accelerating invasive plant invasion and impacting the world’s ecosystems?

Results from new study indicate that biosecurity is not effectively regulating online plant trade. Automated monitoring of e-commerce may help prevent the spread of invasive species, provide information on emerging trade connectivity across national borders, and be used in horizon scanning exercises for early detection of new species and their geographic source areas in international trade. 

Read More

Invasiveness and impact of 48 exotic plant species in native grasslands

Invasiveness and impact of 48 exotic plant species in native grasslands

Researchers quantified and ranked invasiveness and impact of 48 exotic plants based on surveys in the bluebunch wheatgrass habitat type in western Montana. The 31 1-ha sites spanned 20,000 square kilometers of grasslands. Results provided valuable data for mangers when prioritizing exotic plants for control in the bluebunch wheatgrass habitat type. 

http://www.fs.fed.us/rmrs/science-spotlights/invasiveness-and-impact-48-exotic-plant-species-native-grasslands

Read More

North American Invasive Species Management Association Strategic Planning Meeting

In January 2016, the NAISMA Board of Directors met at the Little America Hotel in Salt Lake City, UT to conduct a strategic planning meeting that will plot the course of NAISMA over the next several years. A summary of the meeting with five important goals for NAISMA has been posted here: http://www.naisma.org/images/2016_Summary_of_Strategic_Planning_Meeting.pdf.