Is e-commerce trade accelerating invasive plant invasion and impacting the world’s ecosystems?

Is e-commerce trade accelerating invasive plant invasion and impacting the world’s ecosystems?

Results from new study indicate that biosecurity is not effectively regulating online plant trade. Automated monitoring of e-commerce may help prevent the spread of invasive species, provide information on emerging trade connectivity across national borders, and be used in horizon scanning exercises for early detection of new species and their geographic source areas in international trade. 

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"Drones" approved for agricultural use

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued earlier this month its first-ever drone permits for use in the agriculture sector; exemptions to the current ban on commercial drones. Cited as a “game changer” in terms of monitoring water and nutrient deficiencies in large crop operations, drones also have potential for invasive plant management.
 
This past summer, researchers and personnel at North Dakota State University and University of North Dakota completed flights with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at the Carrington Research Extension Center. In one of the flights, researchers used the UAV to gather information about weed populations, in an effort tied to studies involving herbicide strategies. Read more about this study >
 
For more examples of drones used for invasive plant management, see this blog post by young weed warrior, Commander Ben >