Assessing Phragmites australis (common reed) Coverage with Regards to Land Management

(2019). C. M. Jones and Young, S. Proceedings, Western Society of Weed Science. Pg 3.

Spread of common reed was measured during a 4-year period in Nebraska under various management treatments. Results showed that common reed cover declined with herbicide applications, while grazing maintained consistently low cover. No management approach eliminated common reed which suggests an integration of tools is most effective. Full abstract available at: http://www.wsweedscience.org/wp-content/uploads/WSWS_2019_Proceedings-final.pdf

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Accuracy and Efficiency of Drone Imagery for Detecting Elongated Mustard

(2019) Ransom C. V. and H. E. Olsen. In Proceedings, Western Society of Weed Science. Pg 9.

A study was initiated to evaluate the use of drone imagery to detect and map elongated mustard (Brassica elongata), an invasive perennial mustard. Results of the study showed that while drone imagery offers many opportunities for increased detection of invasive species, it does not appear well suited for detection of individual plants, and would most likely be economical only at maximum flight elevations for detection of larger patches of plants. | Read full abstract... http://www.wsweedscience.org/wp-content/uploads/WSWS_2019_Proceedings-final.pdf

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Interaction between Ailanthus altissima and Native Robinia pseudoacacia in Early Succession: Implications for Forest Management

The study looked at interactions between an exotic invader, tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima), and coexisting black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) and management implications. The study occurred in the Mid-Appalachian region of the eastern United States where black locust is native. Results showed that in early successional sites, tree of heaven should be removed to promote long term community succession in areas where black locust is native. Published in Forests 9(4), 221. 2018

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Dose-response Methodology for Variant Populations of Bohemian Knotweed

Dose-response Methodology for Variant Populations of Bohemian Knotweed

Strelau et al tested herbicide tolerance in two Bohemian knotweed (Reynoutria × bohemica Chrtek & Chrtkov) populations using rhizome fragments. Results showed there was no difference between populations and knotweed was susceptible to the herbicide treatment. Published in 2018 in Canadian Journal of Plant Science 98(6):1380-1383.
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New Invader! The Biology of Canadian Weeds: 156. Daphne laureola L.

New Invader! The Biology of Canadian Weeds: 156. Daphne laureola L.

Spurge-laurel or “Daphne” (Daphne laureola L.) is an invasive, perennial, evergreen shrub introduced to North America as an ornamental. The plant escaped cultivation and is now found on both the east and west coasts of North America. All parts of the shrub are toxic to humans and animals, and dense infestations suppress native vegetation. Strelau et al. 2018. Canadian Journal of Plant Science 98(4):947-958.
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Native Hardwood Tree Seedling Establishment Following Invasive Autumn-Olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) Removal on a Reclaimed Coal Mine

Native Hardwood Tree Seedling Establishment Following Invasive Autumn-Olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) Removal on a Reclaimed Coal Mine

Coal mining has caused large-scale disturbance on over 1.5 million acres in Appalachia. Invasive, non-native autumn olive was historically planted on former coalfields and now impedes reclamation efforts. Read about studies conducted by Virginia Tech on managing autumn olive and restoring native hardwoods.

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Medusahead and Ventenata in the Northern Great Plains Ecoregion: Invasion History and Management Efforts

Medusahead and Ventenata in the Northern Great Plains Ecoregion: Invasion History and Management Efforts

The invasive winter annual grasses medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae) and ventenata (Ventenata dubia) have a relatively long history of spread and impact in the Intermountain West. In 2016, self-sustaining populations of both species were documented in Sheridan County, Wyoming, representing the first known populations of each species in the Great Plains region.

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Developing a Detection Method for New Invaders at the Landscape Scale

The ability to predict plant invasions and detect them early in the process are important considerations for invasive plant management. While agencies and landowners typically take the approach of on-the-ground searches and some may utilize habitat suitability models, these tools may not facilitate detection of incipient infestations when the species is unknown. A team set out to develop a method to identify where to look for a new invader to assist managers in focusing search efforts to areas more prone to invasion.

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