Salmon River Breaks Restoration Pilot Project

Salmon River Breaks Restoration Pilot Project

The Salmon-Challis National Forest and partners initiated a pilot project in fall, 2018 to determine if cheatgrass, spotted knapweed and other invasive plants could be controlled, and create more functional native plant communities. Results showed that Milestone®plus Plateau provided about 90% control of both annual grasses and spotted knapweed 8 months after treatment.

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Where and How to Recycle Pesticide Containers in Your State

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The AC Container Recycling Council offers information on where and how to recycle pesticide containers across the U.S.

Recycling could be as simple as a phone call to your area ACRC Contractor. In most cases, there is no collection fee for growers and commercial applicators. In some cases where there are too few containers, an on-site fee may be charged.

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Timing Aminopyralid to Prevent Seed Production Controls Medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae), and Increase Forage Grasses

Timing Aminopyralid to Prevent Seed Production Controls Medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae), and Increase Forage Grasses

Exotic annual grasses such as medusahead [Taeniatherum caput-medusae (L.) Nevski] and downy brome (Bromus tectorum L.) dominate millions of hectares of grasslands in the western United States. Applying picloram, aminopyralid, and other growth regulator herbicides at late growth stages reduces seed production of most exotic annual grasses.

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Medusahead and Ventenata in the Northern Great Plains Ecoregion: Invasion History and Management Efforts

Medusahead and Ventenata in the Northern Great Plains Ecoregion: Invasion History and Management Efforts

The invasive winter annual grasses medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae) and ventenata (Ventenata dubia) have a relatively long history of spread and impact in the Intermountain West. In 2016, self-sustaining populations of both species were documented in Sheridan County, Wyoming, representing the first known populations of each species in the Great Plains region.

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Native and Invasive Woody Species Differentially Respond to Forest Edges and Forest Successional Age

Forest fragmentation can promote non-native plant invasions by increasing invasive plant seed dispersal and resource availability along edges. A study evaluated germination, survival, and growth of three native and three invasive woody plant species in eastern U.S. forests. Generally, invasive species outperformed native species in this study.

Published by Dinon, WW and others. Forests 9(7), 381. 2018

| Read full abstract …

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Assessing Phragmites australis (common reed) Coverage with Regards to Land Management

(2019). C. M. Jones and Young, S. Proceedings, Western Society of Weed Science. Pg 3.

Spread of common reed was measured during a 4-year period in Nebraska under various management treatments. Results showed that common reed cover declined with herbicide applications, while grazing maintained consistently low cover. No management approach eliminated common reed which suggests an integration of tools is most effective. Full abstract available at: http://www.wsweedscience.org/wp-content/uploads/WSWS_2019_Proceedings-final.pdf

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Accuracy and Efficiency of Drone Imagery for Detecting Elongated Mustard

(2019) Ransom C. V. and H. E. Olsen. In Proceedings, Western Society of Weed Science. Pg 9.

A study was initiated to evaluate the use of drone imagery to detect and map elongated mustard (Brassica elongata), an invasive perennial mustard. Results of the study showed that while drone imagery offers many opportunities for increased detection of invasive species, it does not appear well suited for detection of individual plants, and would most likely be economical only at maximum flight elevations for detection of larger patches of plants. | Read full abstract... http://www.wsweedscience.org/wp-content/uploads/WSWS_2019_Proceedings-final.pdf

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