Dormant Season Management Recommendations for Russian Olive

Dormant Season Management Recommendations for Russian Olive

Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) is a rapid-growing, deciduous, woody shrub or small tree that is invasive in riparian areas, lake shores and natural areas. The invasive plant can cause serious ecological changes to riparian habitats with impacts to wildlife and watershed values, agriculture, and recreation. There are several management options for Russian olive depending on tree size, density, and environmental constraints. The following information summarizes herbicide options for Russian olive management that can be used any time of the year including winter and early spring when trees are dormant. 

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Control of Yellow Starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis) and Coast Fiddleneck (Amsinckia menziesii) with Aminopyralid (Milestone® herbicide)

Control of Yellow Starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis) and Coast Fiddleneck (Amsinckia menziesii) with Aminopyralid (Milestone® herbicide)

Guy B. Kyser, Vanelle Peterson, Steve B. Orloff, Steven D. Wright, Joseph M. DiTomaso (2011). Invasive Plant Science and Management: July-September, Vol. 4, No. 3, pp. 341-348. http://wssajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1614/IPSM-D-11-00002.1

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Managing Autumn Olive in Natural Areas

Autumn olive is an invasive woody shrub or small tree that grows to about 20 feet in height. The plant is commonly found invading open and early-successional woodlands, abandoned agricultural fields, and edges of streams and rivers.

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Autumn Olive and Russian Olive—What’s the Difference?

Autumn Olive and Russian Olive—What’s the Difference?

Autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) and Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) are invasive, deciduous, woody shrubs or small trees that were introduced for landscaping, soil stabilization, and wildlife food/cover. Both plants became invasive in riparian areas, open forests, lake shores, and abandoned fields.

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Managing Invasive Nightshades (Horsenettles) in Natural Areas and Pastures

Managing Invasive Nightshades (Horsenettles) in Natural Areas and Pastures

Silverleaf nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium) and Carolina horsenettle (Solanum carolinense), also known as horse nettle or bull nettle, are deep-rooted, herbaceous, perennial plants in the nightshade family. Article discusses distribution and management of the two invasive nightshades

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Integrative Management of Sericea Lespedeza in Prairie Restorations

Integrative Management of Sericea Lespedeza in Prairie Restorations

Researchers at Southern Illinois University conducted a study on sericea lespedeza in the Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge. The goal of the research was to explore a comprehensive approach to reducing the abundance of sericea lespedeza by: 1) measuring the level of sericea lespedeza control and forb tolerance to varying rates of herbicides applied in spring and summer, 2) comparing effectiveness of summer-applied to spring-applied herbicide treatments, and 3) determining how supplemental seeding of native grasses and forbs enhance restoration success following herbicide treatment. 

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Identification and Management of Absinth Wormwood

Identification and Management of Absinth Wormwood

Absinth wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L.) is a perennial broadleaf plant introduced as an ornamental into North America from Europe in 1841. The plant escaped cultivation and is now widely distributed in the U.S. and Canada. This article describes the biology, ecology, identification, and management of absinth wormwood in natural areas.

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Herbicide Application Timing Critical to Control Exotic Hawkweeds

Herbicide Application Timing Critical to Control Exotic Hawkweeds

This article summarizes field studies established on meadow hawkweed at two sites near Santa, Idaho by Dr. Tim Prather, University of Idaho. Selective herbicides such as Milestone® herbicide have shown to control hawkweeds and release grasses and desirable native forbs. Strategically timed herbicide applications can improve hawkweed control and promote establishment and maintenance of grass cover.


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Common Tansy Identification and Management

Common Tansy Identification and Management

Common tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.), also known as garden tansy and golden buttons, is a perennial forb that reproduces by seed and rhizomes. Read more about identification and management of this invasive plant.

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Identification and Management of Invasive Knotweeds

Identification and Management of Invasive Knotweeds

There are four highly invasive knotweed species typically included in the complex including Japanese knotweed (Fallopia cuspidatum); giant knotweed (Fallopia sachalinense); Bohemian knotweed (Fallopia x bohemicum), a hybrid between giant and Japanese knotweed; and Himalayan knotweed (Persicaria wallichii). Knotweed control efforts typically require a combination of treatments over multiple years. 

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Biennial Thistle Management

Biennial Thistle Management

Several biennial thistles are problematic in North America including bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare), musk thistle (Carduus nutans), plumeless thistle (Carduus acanthoides), and Scotch thistle (Onopordum acanthium). 

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Optimal Herbicide Application Timing for Canada Thistle Control

Optimal Herbicide Application Timing for Canada Thistle Control

by Darrell Deneke, Mike Moechnig, Dave Vos, and Jill Alms, South Dakota State University, Brookings.

Read about field studies conducted on Canada thistle in eastern South Dakota on effect of selective herbicides applied in September, October or November.

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Proper Herbicide Application Timing Maximizes Invasive Plant Control

Proper Herbicide Application Timing Maximizes Invasive Plant Control

Spring and early summer can be excellent times to control actively growing invasive plants with herbicides. Applying herbicides to the target plant at the optimum growth stage is important to maximize control. The following guidelines provide information on the best application timing and rate to control key invasive plants.

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Managing Sericea Lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) with Selective Herbicide

Managing Sericea Lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) with Selective Herbicide

This perennial invasive and exotic legume, also known as Chinese lespedeza, is a threat to native plants in rangeland, pastures, forests and natural areas. Results of herbicide field trials across 21 locations are described.

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