Herbicide Incision Point Injection for Woody Plant Control Saves Time and Resources

Herbicide Incision Point Injection for Woody Plant Control Saves Time and Resources

Studies were initiated by the University of Hawai’i Cooperative Extension Service Invasive Weed Management Program to find a method to improve individual plant herbicide application techniques and determine efficacy of various herbicides applied as undiluted formulations.

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Establishing Wildflowers After Herbicide Application

Establishing Wildflowers After Herbicide Application

by Mark Renz, Mike Moechnig, and Mary Halstvedt

Efforts to restore or rehabilitate mixed wildflower (forb)-grass prairie landscapes in the Midwestern United States are often compromised by the presence of invasive plants. While herbicides provide effective control of invasive plants, they are often not used due to concern that herbicide residues may persist in the soil and impact establishment of wildflowers. Researchers in Wisconsin and South Dakota examined the response of common native wildflower species seeded in the fall or spring following treatments with Milestone® and Transline® herbicides. The results of this research provide promise for land managers balancing invasive plant control and restoring desirable prairie habitat.

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Medusahead Seed Suppression with Spring Application of Milestone® Herbicide

Medusahead Seed Suppression with Spring Application of Milestone® Herbicide

The effectiveness of spring-applied Milestone® specialty herbicide in controlling medusahead seed production was tested in northern California. Read about the effectiveness of controlling this invasive grass with selective herbicides.

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Are Drones in Your Future?

Are Drones in Your Future?

New technology for treating invasive plants in inaccessible areas—Engineering firms specializing in mobile robotic systems have developed multirotor drones (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle- UAV) complete with a lightweight spray system that can be used for a variety of agricultural applications. 

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Sustainable Management of Non-Native Thistles on Colorado’s Western Slope

Sustainable Management of Non-Native Thistles on Colorado’s Western Slope

A research project was initiated on a 10,670-acre ranch near Cimmarron, Colorado to develop sustainable management strategies for musk and Canada thistle. Objectives of the study were three-fold: 1) Investigate invasive thistle distribution through geospatial analysis; 2) determine effects of musk thistle management on forage quality and native plant diversity; and 3) develop a sustainable invasive plant management plan for the ranch.

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New Pulse Sprayer Technology Could Be Useful on Rough Terrain

New Pulse Sprayer Technology Could Be Useful on Rough Terrain

The new pulse sprayer technology is being tested to determine its application on range, pasture and natural areas. This technology keeps droplet size large (to prevent drift) by changing the pulsing cycle (nozzle on/off) instead of pressure which changes the droplet size. This could be very useful on rough terrain where it is difficult to maintain constant speeds.

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Effect of Aerial Herbicide Treatments on Russian Olive Control

Effect of Aerial Herbicide Treatments on Russian Olive Control

Historical management of Russian olive includes mechanical cutting, mowing or shredding followed by herbicide treatments. However, there was limited data on the effectiveness of aerial application of triclopyr ester (Remedy® Ultra) or amine (Garlon® 3A) applied alone and in combination with Milestone® specialty herbicide on Russian olive.  Research methods and results from a study conducted in northcentral Montana are described within this article.

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Synthetic Auxin Herbicides Control Germinating Scotch Broom

Synthetic Auxin Herbicides Control Germinating Scotch Broom

A variety of fire, herbicide, and mechanical treatments are effective for controlling established Scotch broom. However, observations regarding effectiveness of soil-active herbicides in controlling germinating seedlings of Scotch broom are limited. Researchers conducted a series of studies in growth chambers beginning in 2010 to compare the effectiveness of three soil-active auxin herbicides: aminopyralid (Milestone® specialty herbicide), clopyralid (Transline® specialty herbicide) and aminocyclopyrachlor for controlling Scotch broom seedling germination. 

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Logging Debris and Herbicide Treatments for Controlling Scotch Broom

Logging Debris and Herbicide Treatments for Controlling Scotch Broom

Researchers conducted a study near Matlock, Washington investigating the potential of logging debris and herbicide combinations to inhibit germination and development of Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius) seedlings. The study site was a mature Douglas-fir forest that was scheduled for harvest. The forest understory included occasional Scotch broom plants that invaded from a previous disturbance, indicating the likely presence of soil-stored seed. 

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Impact of Canada Thistle Cover on Plant Community Structure in Early Stage Prairie Restoration

Impact of Canada Thistle Cover on Plant Community Structure in Early Stage Prairie Restoration

A field study was conducted in Minnesota to determine if there was a threshold of Canada thistle cover that would impact desirable plant community structure.

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Mapping invasive plants using a helmet based video system

Mapping invasive plants using a helmet based video system

Infested acreage and the time required to estimate it were compared for two inventory methods: a traditional method of mapping on foot with handheld GPS units versus an experimental method of recording video of infestations while riding a mountain bike.

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Tolerance of desirable grasses to Milestone® and Perspective herbicides

Tolerance of desirable grasses to Milestone® and Perspective herbicides

Native perennial grasses are ecologically and economically important in the Intermountain, Great Basin and Northern Great Plains Regions. Herbicides are often used to control invasive broadleaf weeds in these habitat types; therefore, understanding the tolerance of desirable grass species to herbicide treatments is important for land managers.

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Calibration of an Herbicide Ballistic Technology (HBT) Helicopter Platform Targeting Miconia calvescens in Hawaii

Herbicide Ballistic Technology (HBT) is a novel application technique designed to deliver encapsulated herbicide projectiles with long-range accuracy and precision. The performance of an HBT platform for controlling newly invading miconia (Miconia calvescens DC.) plants while conducting helicopter surveillance for remote infestations in Hawaii’s remote watersheds is evaluated in the article. This research article demonstrates the capability of this technique for rapid-response control of remote satellite plant detections.

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