Belwin Conservancy Tackles Grecian Foxglove in Minnesota

Belwin Conservancy Tackles Grecian Foxglove in Minnesota

The restored prairies and woodlands within Belwin Conservancy also serve as models for ecological restoration in the St. Croix Valley. Non-native invasive plants such as Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense L.) have historically been problematic in prairie restorations. However, a new invader, Grecian foxglove (Digitalis lanata) is impacting desirable plant communities especially on prairie sites.

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Early Detection and Control Stops Purple Starthistle Spread in Idaho

Early Detection and Control Stops Purple Starthistle Spread in Idaho

Purple starthistle (Centaurea calcitrapa) is established in at least 14 states in the U.S., but recently expanded its range to Twin Falls County, Idaho. A quick response from the land owner, field inspector, county weed coordinator, and Idaho State Department of Agriculture is stopping the weed in its tracks. 

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Partnership protects greater sage-grouse habitat from invasive plants

Partnership protects greater sage-grouse habitat from invasive plants

FREMONT COUNTY WEED AND PEST CONTROL DISTRICT AND THE U.S. BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT (BLM) TEAMED UP WITH THE WYOMING GAME AND FISH DEPARTMENT
and others to keep invasive plants out of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat.

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Protecting the Upper Ruby River from Invasive Plants

Protecting the Upper Ruby River from Invasive Plants

The Ruby Valley Stock Association and partners organized the Upper Ruby Watershed Cooperative Weed Management Area.  Their management goal of ‘healthy lands’ has led to a reduction in weed establishment and spread, stabilized stream banks, increased aspen regeneration, and reduced sediment into the Ruby River.

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River to River Cooperative Weed Management Area

River to River Cooperative Weed Management Area

Nestled between the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, the River to River Cooperative Weed Management Area (CWMA) encompasses about 2.5 million acres in southern Illinois. The CWMA joins 13 federal and state agencies, organizations, and universities whose common goal is to coordinate efforts and programs on invasive plants across 11 counties in southern Illinois.

 

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Update: Utah Tamarisk Control Project Gets Results

Update: Utah Tamarisk Control Project Gets Results

In June 2008, ArrowCorps5 Scouts, volunteers, and city, state, county and federal agencies joined forces to treat over 46 linear miles of tamarisk within three project areas. The five-day project involved a total of 400 Scouts, 110 agency personnel, and 50 volunteers. When the control project concluded, tamarisk plants within 13,850 acres of U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management land had been treated and controlled.

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Restoring Wisconsin’s Pine Barren Landscape

Restoring Wisconsin’s  Pine Barren Landscape

Actions taken to reestablish the pine barrens ecosystem–timber harvest, mechanical site treatment, and prescribed burning–can increase the risk of spreading invasive plants to non-infested sites. Mitigating these risks is a key component of the Northwest Sands Pine Barren Restoration Project in western Wisconsin.

 

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BLM and partners ‘Restore New Mexico’ on a landscape scale

BLM and partners ‘Restore New Mexico’ on a landscape scale

Amid the barren foothills of the West Potrillo Mountains southwest of Las Cruces, New Mexico, a group that included sportsmen, ranchers, biologists and conservationists gather to witness the early stages of an effort to restore this vast swath of Chihuahuan Desert, a wilderness study area.

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Protecting Paradise Through Partnerships

Protecting Paradise Through Partnerships

The National Park Service join forces with the Maui Invasive Species Committee, and other private, county, state and federal partners in 2001 to improve coordination, increase funding, and develop a comprehensive program to contain and control miconia on Maui.

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Successful Habitat Restoration at Eastern Island, Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge

Successful Habitat Restoration at Eastern Island, Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge

 Midway Atoll is an amazing group of islands supporting and abundance of wildlife, but unfortunately humans have disturbed this fragile ecosystem. The US Fish and Wildlife Service is tasked with enhancing the quality of habitat on the Atoll for nesting seabird species as well as other biological resources. A large part of the restoration efforts include controlling invasive plants and replanting specific areas with native or desirable vegetation.

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Spotted knapweed management possible with planning, persistence, and integrated approach

Spotted knapweed management possible with planning, persistence, and integrated approach

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources protects resource values - Managing invasive plants is a challenge under the best circumstances, but when coupled with high recreational use, miles of trails and diverse ecosystems, it becomes even more complex. 

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