Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Fall is an excellent time to control invasive weeds with herbicides. Late summer and fall rains provide land managers with a good opportunity to extend their application season. 

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Proper Application Timing Maximizes Invasive Plant Control with Milestone® Herbicide

Proper Application Timing Maximizes Invasive Plant Control with Milestone® Herbicide

Recommendations for treating Canada thistle, Russian knapweed, biennial thistles, and spotted and diffuse knapweed in the spring.

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What’s the Difference Between Spotted, Brown, Black, and Meadow Knapweed?

What’s the Difference Between Spotted, Brown, Black, and Meadow Knapweed?

Twenty two different knapweed (Centaurea sp) species are well established in the United States. Four of these knapweed overlap in distribution and share similar morphological characteristics. This includes spotted (C. stoebe), brown (C. jacea), black (C. nigra) and meadow knapweed (C. xmoncktonii). The key to separating these and other knapweed species are the involucre bracts.

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Controlling Invasive Weeds in the Fall

Controlling Invasive Weeds in the Fall

Fall rain and cooler temperatures provide good conditions for extending the herbicide application season. The following species and many others can be effectively controlled in the fall. Follow the links for control recommendations for each species.

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Fall Herbicide Applications to Control Key Invasive Weeds

Fall Herbicide Applications to Control Key Invasive Weeds

Fall is an excellent time to control invasive weeds with Milestone. Late summer and fall rains in many areas of the Central Plains and the West will provide land managers with a good opportunity to extend their application season.

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Spotted Knapweed Management with Herbicides

Spotted Knapweed Management with Herbicides

Spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe) is a tap-rooted perennial forb that spreads by seed. Seedlings and mature plants over-winter in a rosette stage and resume growth in early April. Spotted knapweed blooms from mid to late July through mid September.

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Managing Houndstongue in Natural Areas

Managing Houndstongue in Natural Areas

Houndstongue often grows in a complex with other weeds, such as spotted knapweed and Canada thistle. Application of Opensight® specialty herbicide, which combines aminopyralid and metsulfuron-methyl in a dry, water-dispersible granule formulation, effectively controls a complex of houndstongue, knapweed, thistle and many other broadleaf weeds with one application.

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Boots On the Ground: Managing Invasive Plants in the Nation's Largest County-Owned Park

Boots On the Ground: Managing Invasive Plants in the Nation's Largest County-Owned Park

Beaver Creek Park lies in north-central Montana where the prairie meets the Bear Paw Mountains. Within this 10,000-acre natural area are riparian meadows, rolling grasslands, pine forests, aspen and cottonwood groves, rocky cliffs and cascading waterfalls. This interface of prairie and mountains supports a diverse mix of geology, wildlife and vegetation that remains as unique today as it was centuries ago. Managing a park this large with limited resources requires sound vegetation management practices. 

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Spotted knapweed management possible with planning, persistence, and integrated approach

Spotted knapweed management possible with planning, persistence, and integrated approach

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources protects resource values - Managing invasive plants is a challenge under the best circumstances, but when coupled with high recreational use, miles of trails and diverse ecosystems, it becomes even more complex. 

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Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program – A Tool for Private Land Conservation

Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program – A Tool for Private Land Conservation

The Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program is recognized as a leader in cooperative conservation. Established by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) 25 years ago, the Partners Program has worked with over 45,000 private landowners and restored or enhanced about 1.1 million wetland acres, 3.4 million upland acres and 9,700 miles of stream habitat nationwide. These conservation projects were possible through voluntary agreements with landowners and over 3,100 partnering organizations

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Rocky Mountain Front Weed Roundtable – A Model of Cooperation

Rocky Mountain Front Weed Roundtable – A Model of Cooperation

​The Rocky Mountain Front is one of the "last best places" to hunt, fish, watch wildlife, and raise livestock. It is also the place where you find ranchers laboring next to college students, hunters, anglers, hikers and public land managers under a common goal to help rid the Rocky Mountain Front of noxious weeds. 

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Enhancing Wildlife Habitat Through Partnerships and Perseverance

Enhancing Wildlife Habitat Through Partnerships and Perseverance

Commitment is Key to Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Conservation Efforts - The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation (RMEF) is celebrating 27 years of protecting and enhancing habitat to ensure the future of elk and other wildlife.

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Bighorn Sheep and Elk Habitat Enhancement Project

Bighorn Sheep and Elk Habitat Enhancement Project

Stucky Ridge, a series of grassy, wind-blown benches and timbered gulches located near Anaconda in southwestern Montana, provides critical winter range for elk, mule deer, and bighorn sheep, and is an important rutting and calving area for elk.

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