Common Tansy Identification and Management

Common Tansy Identification and Management

Common tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.), also known as garden tansy and golden buttons, is a perennial forb that reproduces by seed and rhizomes. Read more about identification and management of this invasive plant.

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Biennial Thistle Management

Biennial Thistle Management

Several biennial thistles are problematic in North America including bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare), musk thistle (Carduus nutans), plumeless thistle (Carduus acanthoides), and Scotch thistle (Onopordum acanthium). 

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Yellow Starthistle Management with Herbicide

Yellow Starthistle Management with Herbicide

Herbicides play an important role in integrated management of yellow starthistle and can be used alone or in combination with other techniques such as timely mowing, grazing, burning, or use of biological control insects.

 

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Canada Thistle Management with Herbicides

Canada Thistle Management with Herbicides
Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) is a perennial plant with extensive spreading roots that rapidly forms dense colonies. Vegetative shoots arise from adventitious buds located on Canada thistle roots. Canada thistle also spreads by seed; each shoot can produce more than 1,000 seeds. Plants grow from 1 to 4 feet tall and have spiny, lance-shaped leaves. Purple, lavender, or sometimes white flower heads typically appear from June to October. Read More

Spotted Knapweed Management with Herbicides

Spotted Knapweed Management with Herbicides

Spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe) is a tap-rooted perennial forb that spreads by seed. Seedlings and mature plants over-winter in a rosette stage and resume growth in early April. Spotted knapweed blooms from mid to late July through mid September.

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Managing Sweetclover in Natural Areas

Managing Sweetclover in Natural Areas

Yellow sweetclover (Melilotus officinalis) and white sweetclover (M. alba) are herbaceous, non-native legumes that are widely distributed in the United States. Learn about the biology, ecology, and management recommendations for sweetclover.

Photo by Elizabeth Bella, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

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