Managing Sericea Lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) with Selective Herbicide

Managing Sericea Lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) with Selective Herbicide

This perennial invasive and exotic legume, also known as Chinese lespedeza, is a threat to native plants in rangeland, pastures, forests and natural areas. Results of herbicide field trials across 21 locations are described.

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Managing Invasive Blackberry with Fall-Applied Herbicides

Managing Invasive Blackberry with Fall-Applied Herbicides

The USDA Plants database lists more than 20 Rubus species (and associated hybrids) that were introduced to North America. Himalayan blackberry (Rubus armeniacus) and cutleaf blackberry (Rubus laciniatus) are the two most widespread of the invasive blackberry species.

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Managing Houndstongue in Natural Areas

Managing Houndstongue in Natural Areas

Houndstongue often grows in a complex with other weeds, such as spotted knapweed and Canada thistle. Application of Opensight® specialty herbicide, which combines aminopyralid and metsulfuron-methyl in a dry, water-dispersible granule formulation, effectively controls a complex of houndstongue, knapweed, thistle and many other broadleaf weeds with one application.

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Boots On the Ground: Managing Invasive Plants in the Nation's Largest County-Owned Park

Boots On the Ground: Managing Invasive Plants in the Nation's Largest County-Owned Park

Beaver Creek Park lies in north-central Montana where the prairie meets the Bear Paw Mountains. Within this 10,000-acre natural area are riparian meadows, rolling grasslands, pine forests, aspen and cottonwood groves, rocky cliffs and cascading waterfalls. This interface of prairie and mountains supports a diverse mix of geology, wildlife and vegetation that remains as unique today as it was centuries ago. Managing a park this large with limited resources requires sound vegetation management practices. 

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Woody Plant Control in Northern Prairies

Woody Plant Control in Northern Prairies

Encroachment of woody vegetation threatens the biology and ecology of prairie grasslands. Removing invading woody species improves the function of prairie systems and opens the landscape to provide more suitable habitat for birds and other wildlife that need large blocks of grassland for survival.

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Synthetic Auxin Herbicides Control Germinating Scotch Broom

Synthetic Auxin Herbicides Control Germinating Scotch Broom

A variety of fire, herbicide, and mechanical treatments are effective for controlling established Scotch broom. However, observations regarding effectiveness of soil-active herbicides in controlling germinating seedlings of Scotch broom are limited. Researchers conducted a series of studies in growth chambers beginning in 2010 to compare the effectiveness of three soil-active auxin herbicides: aminopyralid (Milestone® specialty herbicide), clopyralid (Transline® specialty herbicide) and aminocyclopyrachlor for controlling Scotch broom seedling germination. 

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Logging Debris and Herbicide Treatments for Controlling Scotch Broom

Logging Debris and Herbicide Treatments for Controlling Scotch Broom

Researchers conducted a study near Matlock, Washington investigating the potential of logging debris and herbicide combinations to inhibit germination and development of Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius) seedlings. The study site was a mature Douglas-fir forest that was scheduled for harvest. The forest understory included occasional Scotch broom plants that invaded from a previous disturbance, indicating the likely presence of soil-stored seed. 

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Managing Scotch Thistle on Rangeland and Natural Areas

Managing Scotch Thistle  on Rangeland and Natural Areas

Scotch thistle (Onopordum acanthium) is a robust non-native plant well established throughout much of the United States and Canada. Severe infestations can form tall, dense stands that impede livestock and wildlife access to desirable forage plants, impacting wildlife habitat and limiting carrying capacity of infested rangeland and natural areas.

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Belwin Conservancy Tackles Grecian Foxglove in Minnesota

Belwin Conservancy Tackles Grecian Foxglove in Minnesota

The restored prairies and woodlands within Belwin Conservancy also serve as models for ecological restoration in the St. Croix Valley. Non-native invasive plants such as Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense L.) have historically been problematic in prairie restorations. However, a new invader, Grecian foxglove (Digitalis lanata) is impacting desirable plant communities especially on prairie sites.

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UPDATED! Invasive Plant Management with Milestone® and Other Herbicides (Guide for Natural Area Managers)

UPDATED! Invasive Plant Management with Milestone® and Other Herbicides (Guide for Natural Area Managers)

Technical information about herbicides, recommendations and rates for key species, native forb tolerance, herbicide use around woody species, revegetation guidelines, calibration guidelines, answers to frequency asked questions, and more.

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Spotted knapweed management possible with planning, persistence, and integrated approach

Spotted knapweed management possible with planning, persistence, and integrated approach

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources protects resource values - Managing invasive plants is a challenge under the best circumstances, but when coupled with high recreational use, miles of trails and diverse ecosystems, it becomes even more complex. 

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