Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Fall is an excellent time to control invasive weeds with herbicides. Late summer and fall rains provide land managers with a good opportunity to extend their application season. 

Read More

Proper Application Timing Maximizes Invasive Plant Control with Milestone® Herbicide

Proper Application Timing Maximizes Invasive Plant Control with Milestone® Herbicide

Recommendations for treating Canada thistle, Russian knapweed, biennial thistles, and spotted and diffuse knapweed in the spring.

Read More

Native Grass Establishment Following Herbicide Applications

Native Grass Establishment Following Herbicide Applications

Herbicides are an important tool for removing noxious or invasive weeds from plant communities, allowing desirable vegetation to respond. Field research trials were established to determine if warm and cool season grasses could be planted either in late autumn as a dormant fall planting or in the spring after a September application of herbicide.

Read More

Herbicide Application Timing Critical to Control Exotic Hawkweeds

Herbicide Application Timing Critical to Control Exotic Hawkweeds

This article summarizes field studies established on meadow hawkweed at two sites near Santa, Idaho by Dr. Tim Prather, University of Idaho. Selective herbicides such as Milestone® herbicide have shown to control hawkweeds and release grasses and desirable native forbs. Strategically timed herbicide applications can improve hawkweed control and promote establishment and maintenance of grass cover.


Read More

Identification and Management of Invasive Knotweeds

Identification and Management of Invasive Knotweeds

There are four highly invasive knotweed species typically included in the complex including Japanese knotweed (Fallopia cuspidatum); giant knotweed (Fallopia sachalinense); Bohemian knotweed (Fallopia x bohemicum), a hybrid between giant and Japanese knotweed; and Himalayan knotweed (Persicaria wallichii). Knotweed control efforts typically require a combination of treatments over multiple years. 

Read More

Optimal Herbicide Application Timing for Canada Thistle Control

Optimal Herbicide Application Timing for Canada Thistle Control

by Darrell Deneke, Mike Moechnig, Dave Vos, and Jill Alms, South Dakota State University, Brookings.

Read about field studies conducted on Canada thistle in eastern South Dakota on effect of selective herbicides applied in September, October or November.

Read More

Effect of Milestone® on Canada Thistle and the Native Plant Community in a Restored Tallgrass Prairie

Effect of Milestone® on Canada Thistle and the Native Plant Community in a Restored Tallgrass Prairie

Native tallgrass prairies are diverse ecosystems that evolved with periodic disturbances such as fire and grazing pressure and are dominated by species that include big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii Vitman), Indiangrass [Sorghastrum nutans(L.) Nash], and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.).

Read More

After the Smoke Clears – Resources for Addressing Post-fire Weed Invasion and Expansion

After the Smoke Clears – Resources for Addressing Post-fire Weed Invasion and Expansion

Catastrophic fire seasons of recent decades prompted a number of agencies and researchers to synthesize and expand upon the knowledge-base related to invasive plant issues following wildfires. The following short list of literature reviews, handbooks, and recently published research provides a starting point for exploring issues and developing management guidelines related to invasive plants following wildfires. 

Read More

Establishing Wildflowers After Herbicide Application

Establishing Wildflowers After Herbicide Application

by Mark Renz, Mike Moechnig, and Mary Halstvedt

Efforts to restore or rehabilitate mixed wildflower (forb)-grass prairie landscapes in the Midwestern United States are often compromised by the presence of invasive plants. While herbicides provide effective control of invasive plants, they are often not used due to concern that herbicide residues may persist in the soil and impact establishment of wildflowers. Researchers in Wisconsin and South Dakota examined the response of common native wildflower species seeded in the fall or spring following treatments with Milestone® and Transline® herbicides. The results of this research provide promise for land managers balancing invasive plant control and restoring desirable prairie habitat.

Read More

Update: Utah Tamarisk Control Project Gets Results

Update: Utah Tamarisk Control Project Gets Results

In June 2008, ArrowCorps5 Scouts, volunteers, and city, state, county and federal agencies joined forces to treat over 46 linear miles of tamarisk within three project areas. The five-day project involved a total of 400 Scouts, 110 agency personnel, and 50 volunteers. When the control project concluded, tamarisk plants within 13,850 acres of U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management land had been treated and controlled.

Read More

Research Studies Support Aquatic Labeling of Aminopyralid

Research Studies Support Aquatic Labeling of Aminopyralid

Field research trials were initiated in ponds and flowing water systems to gather data to support the addition of aquatic uses to aminopyralid product labels. Research was designed to establish food tolerances for fish, shellfish and crustaceans, and define herbicide dissipation in water and sediment over time.

Read More

Restoring Wisconsin’s Pine Barren Landscape

Restoring Wisconsin’s  Pine Barren Landscape

Actions taken to reestablish the pine barrens ecosystem–timber harvest, mechanical site treatment, and prescribed burning–can increase the risk of spreading invasive plants to non-infested sites. Mitigating these risks is a key component of the Northwest Sands Pine Barren Restoration Project in western Wisconsin.

 

Read More