Saltcedar and Russian Olive Management

Saltcedar and Russian Olive Management

Saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima, T. pentandra, T. chinensis, and T. parviflora) and Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia L.) are rapid growing, non-native deciduous trees that were introduced into the United States for erosion control (saltcedar), windbreaks (Russian olive) or as ornamental plantings.

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Dormant Season Management Recommendations for Russian Olive

Dormant Season Management Recommendations for Russian Olive

Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) is a rapid-growing, deciduous, woody shrub or small tree that is invasive in riparian areas, lake shores and natural areas. The invasive plant can cause serious ecological changes to riparian habitats with impacts to wildlife and watershed values, agriculture, and recreation. There are several management options for Russian olive depending on tree size, density, and environmental constraints. The following information summarizes herbicide options for Russian olive management that can be used any time of the year including winter and early spring when trees are dormant. 

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Managing Autumn Olive in Natural Areas

Autumn olive is an invasive woody shrub or small tree that grows to about 20 feet in height. The plant is commonly found invading open and early-successional woodlands, abandoned agricultural fields, and edges of streams and rivers.

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Integrative Management of Sericea Lespedeza in Prairie Restorations

Integrative Management of Sericea Lespedeza in Prairie Restorations

Researchers at Southern Illinois University conducted a study on sericea lespedeza in the Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge. The goal of the research was to explore a comprehensive approach to reducing the abundance of sericea lespedeza by: 1) measuring the level of sericea lespedeza control and forb tolerance to varying rates of herbicides applied in spring and summer, 2) comparing effectiveness of summer-applied to spring-applied herbicide treatments, and 3) determining how supplemental seeding of native grasses and forbs enhance restoration success following herbicide treatment. 

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Managing Invasive Blackberry with Fall-Applied Herbicides

Managing Invasive Blackberry with Fall-Applied Herbicides

The USDA Plants database lists more than 20 Rubus species (and associated hybrids) that were introduced to North America. Himalayan blackberry (Rubus armeniacus) and cutleaf blackberry (Rubus laciniatus) are the two most widespread of the invasive blackberry species.

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Tips for Managing Undesirable Brush and Vines in Fall, Winter, and Early Spring

Tips for Managing Undesirable Brush and Vines in Fall, Winter, and Early Spring

Undesirable or invasive woody vegetation threatens the biology and ecology of prairie grasslands and native woodlands. Removing invading woody species can be accomplished year-long, with fall, winter and early spring herbicide applications, extending your vegetation management efforts.

 

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Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Fall is an excellent time to control invasive weeds with herbicides. Late summer and fall rains provide land managers with a good opportunity to extend their application season. 

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Herbicide Incision Point Injection for Woody Plant Control Saves Time and Resources

Herbicide Incision Point Injection for Woody Plant Control Saves Time and Resources

Studies were initiated by the University of Hawai’i Cooperative Extension Service Invasive Weed Management Program to find a method to improve individual plant herbicide application techniques and determine efficacy of various herbicides applied as undiluted formulations.

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Woody Plant Control in Northern Prairies

Woody Plant Control in Northern Prairies

Encroachment of woody vegetation threatens the biology and ecology of prairie grasslands. Removing invading woody species improves the function of prairie systems and opens the landscape to provide more suitable habitat for birds and other wildlife that need large blocks of grassland for survival.

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Dolores River Restoration Partnership

Dolores River Restoration Partnership

In 2009 a coalition of concerned individuals and agencies took action to restore about 175 miles of riparian habitat along the Dolores River between McPhee Reservoir and its confluence with the Colorado River just north of Moab, Utah. 

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Logging Debris and Herbicide Treatments for Controlling Scotch Broom

Logging Debris and Herbicide Treatments for Controlling Scotch Broom

Researchers conducted a study near Matlock, Washington investigating the potential of logging debris and herbicide combinations to inhibit germination and development of Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius) seedlings. The study site was a mature Douglas-fir forest that was scheduled for harvest. The forest understory included occasional Scotch broom plants that invaded from a previous disturbance, indicating the likely presence of soil-stored seed. 

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UPDATED! Invasive Plant Management with Milestone® and Other Herbicides (Guide for Natural Area Managers)

UPDATED! Invasive Plant Management with Milestone® and Other Herbicides (Guide for Natural Area Managers)

Technical information about herbicides, recommendations and rates for key species, native forb tolerance, herbicide use around woody species, revegetation guidelines, calibration guidelines, answers to frequency asked questions, and more.

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Update: Utah Tamarisk Control Project Gets Results

Update: Utah Tamarisk Control Project Gets Results

In June 2008, ArrowCorps5 Scouts, volunteers, and city, state, county and federal agencies joined forces to treat over 46 linear miles of tamarisk within three project areas. The five-day project involved a total of 400 Scouts, 110 agency personnel, and 50 volunteers. When the control project concluded, tamarisk plants within 13,850 acres of U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management land had been treated and controlled.

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Protecting Paradise Through Partnerships

Protecting Paradise Through Partnerships

The National Park Service join forces with the Maui Invasive Species Committee, and other private, county, state and federal partners in 2001 to improve coordination, increase funding, and develop a comprehensive program to contain and control miconia on Maui.

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Protecting Prairies - US Fish and Wildlife Service Manages Invasive Woody Plants

Protecting Prairies - US Fish and Wildlife Service Manages Invasive Woody Plants

The blending of woodland and prairie biomes within Litchfield Wetland Management District in south-central Minnesota provides habitat for a variety of wildlife species, but also increases the risk of woody plant encroachment in prairie and grasslands.

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Partnerships Provide Solutions to Invasive Plant Management

Partnerships Provide Solutions to Invasive Plant Management

Weed Inventory Key to Measuring Program Success at Dinosaur National Monument in Utah - Located on the southeast flank of the Uinta Mountains, Dinosaur National Monument encompasses over 210,000 acres on the Colorado and Utah border.

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