Proper Application Timing Maximizes Invasive Plant Control with Milestone® Herbicide

Proper Application Timing Maximizes Invasive Plant Control with Milestone® Herbicide

Recommendations for treating Canada thistle, Russian knapweed, biennial thistles, and spotted and diffuse knapweed in the spring.

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Optimal Herbicide Application Timing for Canada Thistle Control

Optimal Herbicide Application Timing for Canada Thistle Control

by Darrell Deneke, Mike Moechnig, Dave Vos, and Jill Alms, South Dakota State University, Brookings.

Read about field studies conducted on Canada thistle in eastern South Dakota on effect of selective herbicides applied in September, October or November.

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Controlling Invasive Weeds in the Fall

Controlling Invasive Weeds in the Fall

Fall rain and cooler temperatures provide good conditions for extending the herbicide application season. The following species and many others can be effectively controlled in the fall. Follow the links for control recommendations for each species.

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Fall Herbicide Applications to Control Key Invasive Weeds

Fall Herbicide Applications to Control Key Invasive Weeds

Fall is an excellent time to control invasive weeds with Milestone. Late summer and fall rains in many areas of the Central Plains and the West will provide land managers with a good opportunity to extend their application season.

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Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Fall is an excellent time to control invasive weeds with herbicides. Late summer and fall rains provide land managers with a good opportunity to extend their application season. 

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Canada Thistle Management with Herbicides

Canada Thistle Management with Herbicides
Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) is a perennial plant with extensive spreading roots that rapidly forms dense colonies. Vegetative shoots arise from adventitious buds located on Canada thistle roots. Canada thistle also spreads by seed; each shoot can produce more than 1,000 seeds. Plants grow from 1 to 4 feet tall and have spiny, lance-shaped leaves. Purple, lavender, or sometimes white flower heads typically appear from June to October. Read More

Effect of Milestone® on Canada Thistle and the Native Plant Community in a Restored Tallgrass Prairie

Effect of Milestone® on Canada Thistle and the Native Plant Community in a Restored Tallgrass Prairie

Native tallgrass prairies are diverse ecosystems that evolved with periodic disturbances such as fire and grazing pressure and are dominated by species that include big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii Vitman), Indiangrass [Sorghastrum nutans(L.) Nash], and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.).

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Native and Exotic Thistles: Who's Jekyll, Who's Hyde?

Native and Exotic Thistles: Who's Jekyll, Who's Hyde?

There are five common exotic thistles (exluding Centaurea spp., both the starthistles and knapweeds) in the western U.S. that are problematic to some degree across a variety of habitats.

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Managing Houndstongue in Natural Areas

Managing Houndstongue in Natural Areas

Houndstongue often grows in a complex with other weeds, such as spotted knapweed and Canada thistle. Application of Opensight® specialty herbicide, which combines aminopyralid and metsulfuron-methyl in a dry, water-dispersible granule formulation, effectively controls a complex of houndstongue, knapweed, thistle and many other broadleaf weeds with one application.

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Sustainable Management of Non-Native Thistles on Colorado’s Western Slope

Sustainable Management of Non-Native Thistles on Colorado’s Western Slope

A research project was initiated on a 10,670-acre ranch near Cimmarron, Colorado to develop sustainable management strategies for musk and Canada thistle. Objectives of the study were three-fold: 1) Investigate invasive thistle distribution through geospatial analysis; 2) determine effects of musk thistle management on forage quality and native plant diversity; and 3) develop a sustainable invasive plant management plan for the ranch.

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Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program – A Tool for Private Land Conservation

Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program – A Tool for Private Land Conservation

The Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program is recognized as a leader in cooperative conservation. Established by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) 25 years ago, the Partners Program has worked with over 45,000 private landowners and restored or enhanced about 1.1 million wetland acres, 3.4 million upland acres and 9,700 miles of stream habitat nationwide. These conservation projects were possible through voluntary agreements with landowners and over 3,100 partnering organizations

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Rocky Mountain Front Weed Roundtable – A Model of Cooperation

Rocky Mountain Front Weed Roundtable – A Model of Cooperation

​The Rocky Mountain Front is one of the "last best places" to hunt, fish, watch wildlife, and raise livestock. It is also the place where you find ranchers laboring next to college students, hunters, anglers, hikers and public land managers under a common goal to help rid the Rocky Mountain Front of noxious weeds. 

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Partnerships Provide Solutions to Invasive Plant Management

Partnerships Provide Solutions to Invasive Plant Management

Weed Inventory Key to Measuring Program Success at Dinosaur National Monument in Utah - Located on the southeast flank of the Uinta Mountains, Dinosaur National Monument encompasses over 210,000 acres on the Colorado and Utah border.

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Overcoming Challenges to Restore Native Tallgrass Prairie

Overcoming Challenges to Restore Native Tallgrass Prairie

University and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Partner to Find Solutions - The Kufrin Waterfowl Production Area (WPA) is the heart of some of the best remaining waterfowl habitat in Minnesota.

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