What is Japanese Hop?

What is Japanese Hop?

Japanese hop (Humulus japonicas) is an annual, climbing or trailing vine that is native to eastern Asia. The plant was introduced to North America in the mid-to-late 1880s as an ornamental, and has become invasive in the eastern half of the United States and southeast Canadian provinces. Read about distribution, identification and management of the plant.

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Distinguishing Invasive Buckthorn from Native Alderleaf Buckthorn

Distinguishing Invasive Buckthorn from Native Alderleaf Buckthorn

Distinguishing between non-native and native buckthorn is important so that management efforts can be targeted appropriately. The following description separates two invasive buckthorns from native alderleaf buckthorn.

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Managing Tall Buttercup in Pastures and Natural Areas

Managing Tall Buttercup in Pastures and Natural Areas

Tall buttercup is an introduced perennial forb that is widespread throughout much of North America. It is invasive on irrigated and sub-irrigated pastures, meadows, stream banks, roadsides, and ditches. Integrating various management techniques—prevention along with herbicides, mechanical, manual, biological, and cultural methods—will optimize control of tall buttercup.

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Identification and Management of Brown, Black, and Meadow Knapweed

Identification and Management of Brown, Black, and Meadow Knapweed

Twenty two different knapweed species (Centaurea sp) are well established in North America. Most are introduced opportunists that have aggressively invaded natural areas, pastures, open woodlands, rights-of-way, and disturbed areas. Brown (C. jacea), black (C. nigra) and meadow knapweed (C. ×moncktonii) are long-lived perennial plants that are problematic in the United States and southern Canada.

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Embracing Drone Technology

Embracing Drone Technology

Invasive plants often establish and flourish on steep, rough terrain that is difficult to access. This makes early detection and management difficult and hazardous work. Nigel Davis, a commercial applicator in Helena, Montana, understands the challenges involved with treating invasive plants in natural areas with ground-based equipment. This makes early detection and management difficult and hazardous work. Nigel Davis, a commercial applicator in Helena, Montana, understands the challenges involved with treating invasive plants in natural areas with ground-based equipment.

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Identification and Management of Absinth Wormwood

Identification and Management of Absinth Wormwood

Absinth wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L.) is a perennial broadleaf plant introduced as an ornamental into North America from Europe in 1841. The plant escaped cultivation and is now widely distributed in the U.S. and Canada. This article describes the biology, ecology, identification, and management of absinth wormwood in natural areas.

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Identification and Management of Japanese Chaff Flower

Identification and Management of Japanese Chaff Flower

Japanese chaff flower (Achyranthes japonica) is a highly invasive, non-native, perennial plant in the Amaranth family. This article discusses distribution and management of this non-native plant.

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Control of Yellow Starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis) and Coast Fiddleneck (Amsinckia menziesii) with Aminopyralid (Milestone® specialty herbicide)

Control of Yellow Starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis) and Coast Fiddleneck (Amsinckia menziesii) with Aminopyralid (Milestone® specialty herbicide)

Guy B. Kyser, Vanelle Peterson, Steve B. Orloff, Steven D. Wright, Joseph M. DiTomaso (2011). Invasive Plant Science and Management: July-September, Vol. 4, No. 3, pp. 341-348. http://wssajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1614/IPSM-D-11-00002.1

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Integrated Management of Yellow Starthistle with Burning, Aminopyralid (Milestone® specialty herbicide), and Revegetation

Integrated Management of Yellow Starthistle with Burning, Aminopyralid (Milestone® specialty herbicide), and Revegetation

A summary of research presented as a poster–Integrated Management of Yellow Starthistle with Burning, Aminopyralid (Milestone), and Revegetation–at the Western Society of Weed Science Annual Meeting, Reno, NV 2012 by Guy B. Kyser,  Arthur W. Hazebrook, and Joe DiTomaso.

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Controlling Invasive Weeds in the Fall

Controlling Invasive Weeds in the Fall

Fall rain and cooler temperatures provide good conditions for extending the herbicide application season. The following species and many others can be effectively controlled in the fall. Follow the links for control recommendations for each species.

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Research and Management Tips for Controlling Yellow Starthistle

Research and Management Tips for Controlling Yellow Starthistle

This TechNote summarizes research on: 1) Integrating herbicides with other methods for managing yellow starthistle and 2) Controlling coast fiddleneck (Amsinckia menziesii)and yellow starthistle. Also included are practical management tips on herbicide rate and time of application to optimize yellow starthistle control.

 

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Yellow Starthistle Management with Herbicide

Yellow Starthistle Management with Herbicide

Herbicides play an important role in integrated management of yellow starthistle and can be used alone or in combination with other techniques such as timely mowing, grazing, burning, or use of biological control insects.

 

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Managing Invasive Blackberry with Fall-Applied Herbicides

Managing Invasive Blackberry with Fall-Applied Herbicides

The USDA Plants database lists more than 20 Rubus species (and associated hybrids) that were introduced to North America. Himalayan blackberry (Rubus armeniacus) and cutleaf blackberry (Rubus laciniatus) are the two most widespread of the invasive blackberry species.

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Fall Herbicide Applications to Control Key Invasive Weeds

Fall Herbicide Applications to Control Key Invasive Weeds

Fall is an excellent time to control invasive weeds with Milestone. Late summer and fall rains in many areas of the Central Plains and the West will provide land managers with a good opportunity to extend their application season.

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Tips for Managing Undesirable Brush and Vines in Fall, Winter, and Early Spring

Tips for Managing Undesirable Brush and Vines in Fall, Winter, and Early Spring

Undesirable or invasive woody vegetation threatens the biology and ecology of prairie grasslands and native woodlands. Removing invading woody species can be accomplished year-long, with fall, winter and early spring herbicide applications, extending your vegetation management efforts.

 

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Identification and Management of Three Toxic Plants in the Carrot Family

Identification and Management of Three Toxic Plants in the Carrot Family

Plants in the carrot (Apiaceae) family share the characteristic of an umbel-shaped flower head. The family includes hundreds of plants, some that are valuable vegetables and herbs, and a few that are masters in chemical warfare. Accurate identification is important for management and avoiding accidental poisoning. This article reviews distribution, identification and management of three invasive, toxic plants in the carrot family: poison hemlock (Conium maculatum), wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), and giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum).

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What's the Most Poisonous Plant in North America?

What's the Most Poisonous Plant in North America?

The carrot (Apiaceae) family comprises 434 genera and about 3,700 species and is characterized by a flat-topped flower cluster, called an umbel. Water hemlock (Cicuta), one of several toxic members of this family, is considered to be the most toxic plant in North America. There are four species of water hemlock in North America, all highly poisonous and native to North America: spotted (C. maculata), western (C. douglasii), bulblet-bearing (C. bulbifera), and Mackenzie’s (C. virosa).

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Understanding and Minimizing Impacts of Delaying Rights-of-Way Maintenance

Understanding and Minimizing Impacts of Delaying Rights-of-Way Maintenance

Managing incompatible woody vegetation along utility and transportation rights-of-way (ROW) requires careful planning, consistent budgets, and judicious allocation of time and resources. When budgets or resources are inadequate, planned vegetation maintenance may be postponed to the following growing season or beyond. While delaying maintenance for even one year allows woody vegetation to increase in density and height, the actual increase in time and material to control the vegetation after one or more years of delayed treatment has not been determined.

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Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Controlling Invasive Plants in Fall and Early Winter

Fall is an excellent time to control invasive weeds with herbicides. Late summer and fall rains provide land managers with a good opportunity to extend their application season. 

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