Effectiveness of Herbicides Applied Mid-Summer or Fall on Canada Thistle Control

Effectiveness of Herbicides Applied Mid-Summer or Fall on Canada Thistle Control

Field studies were established on Canada thistle in several states in the upper Midwest to measure effectiveness of herbicides applied at various application times including mid-summer and fall. Milestone® herbicide at 5 and 7 fluid ounces per acre (fl oz/A) was applied at various growth stages from May through early November.

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Eradicating Oriental Bittersweet in Southeastern Minnesota

Eradicating Oriental Bittersweet in Southeastern Minnesota

A group of committed biologists, conservationists and volunteers are tackling oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), an invasive woody vine that alters ecosystems and impacts property values. Read how education and outreach efforts are key to eradication efforts

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Oriental Bittersweet Identification and Management

Oriental Bittersweet Identification and Management

Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) is native to Korea, China, and Japan. It is naturalized in much of the eastern half of the United States and in Ontario and Quebec Canada. Read about identification and management of this invasive woody vine.

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Identification & Management of Purple Loosestrife

Identification & Management of Purple Loosestrife

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) is a perennial, rhizomatous forb that invades riparian areas and other waterways throughout most of the U.S. and southern Canada  The invasive plant threatens biodiversity of wetlands. Successful management requires integrating various management methods.

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Long-term Control of Crown Vetch at a Wisconsin Wildlife Refuge

Long-term Control of Crown Vetch at a Wisconsin Wildlife Refuge

This article reviews results of field trials conducted on a crown vetch infestation in the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge in Wisconsin. Eight years following herbicide application control remained greater than 85%.

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Managing Black Locust in Natural Areas

Managing Black Locust in Natural Areas

Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is difficult to control once established outside its native range. The tree is currently naturalized throughout much of the United States,. This article describes effective management methods for this invasive woody tree.

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Managing Cocklebur in Natural Areas

Managing Cocklebur in Natural Areas

Common or “rough” cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.) is a native, tap rooted, annual broadleaf weed. The plant is a prolific seed producer that spreads easily because of its bur-like seed head. Management of the plant is described.

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What's the Most Poisonous Plant in North America?

What's the Most Poisonous Plant in North America?

The carrot (Apiaceae) family comprises 434 genera and about 3,700 species and is characterized by a flat-topped flower cluster, called an umbel. Water hemlock (Cicuta), one of several toxic members of this family, is considered to be the most toxic plant in North America. There are four species of water hemlock in North America, all highly poisonous and native to North America: spotted (C. maculata), western (C. douglasii), bulblet-bearing (C. bulbifera), and Mackenzie’s (C. virosa).

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Controlling Tansy Ragwort in Natural Areas

Controlling Tansy Ragwort in Natural Areas

Tansy ragwort (Senecio jacobaea) is a winter annual, biennial, or short-lived perennial plant in the sunflower family. The plant is classified as a noxious weed in seven western states (AZ, OR, WA, CA, MT, CO and ID), two eastern states (CT and MA), and Canadian provinces.The invasive plant is well suited to disturbed sites such as roadsides, open forests, logged areas, burned sites, and over-grazed meadows and pastures.  Read tips and recommendations for managing tansy ragwort in natural areas.

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Managing Scotch Thistle on Rangeland and Natural Areas

Managing Scotch Thistle  on Rangeland and Natural Areas

Scotch thistle (Onopordum acanthium) is a robust non-native plant well established throughout much of the United States and Canada. Severe infestations can form tall, dense stands that impede livestock and wildlife access to desirable forage plants, impacting wildlife habitat and limiting carrying capacity of infested rangeland and natural areas.

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SALTCEDAR AND RUSSIAN OLIVE CONTROL WITH AMINOPYRALID CONTAINING HERBICIDE TREATMENTS

SALTCEDAR AND RUSSIAN OLIVE CONTROL WITH AMINOPYRALID CONTAINING HERBICIDE TREATMENTS

An article by Byron Sleugh, Mary Halstvedt, Chad Cummings, Vanelle Peterson, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN; and Robert G. Wilson, University of Nebraska Panhandle Research Center, Scottsbluff, NE from 2010 Western Society of Weed Science Proceedings.

 

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Saint Johnswort Biology, Impact and Management

Saint Johnswort Biology, Impact and Management

St. Johnswort, also known as Klamath weed or goatweed, was introduced to the United States as an ornamental and medicinal plan. This taprooted perennial now occurs in all but 2 states and is a challenge to land managers. Read more about the impacts, identification, and management using various methods. 

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Proper Application Timing Maximizes Invasive Plant Control with Milestone® Herbicide

Proper Application Timing Maximizes Invasive Plant Control with Milestone® Herbicide

Recommendations for treating Canada thistle, Russian knapweed, biennial thistles, and spotted and diffuse knapweed in the spring.

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Identification and Management of Three Toxic Plants in the Carrot Family

Identification and Management of Three Toxic Plants in the Carrot Family

Plants in the carrot (Apiaceae) family share the characteristic of an umbel-shaped flower head. The family includes hundreds of plants, some that are valuable vegetables and herbs, and a few that are masters in chemical warfare. Accurate identification is important for management and avoiding accidental poisoning. This article reviews distribution, identification and management of three invasive, toxic plants in the carrot family: poison hemlock (Conium maculatum), wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), and giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum).

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What’s the Difference Between Spotted, Brown, Black, and Meadow Knapweed?

What’s the Difference Between Spotted, Brown, Black, and Meadow Knapweed?

Twenty two different knapweed (Centaurea sp) species are well established in the United States. Four of these knapweed overlap in distribution and share similar morphological characteristics. This includes spotted (C. stoebe), brown (C. jacea), black (C. nigra) and meadow knapweed (C. xmoncktonii). The key to separating these and other knapweed species are the involucre bracts.

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