West Region Summary: The Most Popular Mobile Applications for Invasive Plant Managers

Mobile Apps, Ratings, and Comments

By Celestine Duncan, Melissa Munson, and Nann Parrett[1] 

General Overview

For the purpose of this summary, the West Region encompasses states from Montana south through New Mexico and west to the Pacific Coast. In the West, 143 invasive plant managers responded to the survey from 10 states and three geographic regions. Seventy-eight percent of respondents were from four states: Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. Montana accounted for about half of the total respondents. State, federal, county, or city entities accounted for 79 percent of survey respondents in the West. The remaining 21 percent were individuals, organizations, or businesses that represented the private sector. Of those responding from the West, 66 percent used mobile apps on their smartphone or tablet as part of their invasive plant management program. Details on demographics and affiliation for this survey are available here.

Respondents from the West cited a total of 75 different apps used in invasive plant programs. EDDMapS (which includes regional versions) and the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) family of apps were the two most commonly used among respondents, with ESRI-Collector being the most frequently cited. EDDMaps and ESRI were cited by 55 and 36 percent of respondents, respectively. The third and fourth most commonly used apps in the West were Montana Grasses and Avenza PDF Maps.

Categories for apps included plant identification, survey/mapping, management recommendations, sprayer calibration, and other. Details regarding the names of individual apps, number of respondents using each app, satisfactory ratings, and comments are described in the tables below.

Table 1: List of 75 mobile apps, average satisfaction rating, and number of respondents using the app in each category. Average satisfaction rating was based on a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being completely dissatisfied and 10 being completely satisfied. Apps are organized by number of respondents using them (most to least cited).

 

 

Average Satisfaction Rating (# of respondents) in Each Category

APP NAME

PLANT ID

SURVEY/ MAPPING

MANAGEMENT RECOMMEND.

SPRAYER CALIBRATION

OTHER

EDDMapS

EDDMapS West (35)

6.5 (13)

7.6 (20)

7.5 (2)

EDDMapS (11)

7.6 (5)

7.3 (6)

EDDMapS West and PRO (4)

10 (1)

7.5 (2)

10 (1)

EDDMapS - WA Invasives (2)

8 (1)

6 (1)

ESRI, ARC

ArcGIS (3)

6.6 (3)

ArcGIS Collector (24)

7.8 (24)

ArcGIS Collector + iForm (2)

 

8.5 (2)

 

 

 

ArcGIS Explorer (1) + Survey 123

9 (1)

ArcPad (1)

8 (1)

Survey123 for ArcGIS (3)

 

8.6 (3)

S1 with ArcMap (1)

6 (1)

Montana Grasses

8.6 (14)

Avenza PDF Maps

7.6 (8)

9 (1)

Fulcrum mobile solutions

8.5 (6)

8 (1)

Montana Wildflowers

8.6 (7)

MapItFast, AgTerra

 

7.5 (6)

 

 

 

Colo. Dept. Ag. Weed ID app.

4.6 (5)

Grass Snap, Univ. of Nebraska

 

 

8 (1)

 

7.2 (4)

iForm (Zerion Corp.) also used with ESRI

10 (1)

9 (2)

 

 

 

Flora of Yellowstone

9.5 (4)

iBioControl (bugwood.org)

9 (1)

8.5 (2)

6 (1)

Oregon Wildflowers

8 (4)

iForm (Zerion Corp.)

10 (1)

9 (2)

 

 

 

Alaska Weeds ID

8 (2)

8 (1)

Bayer Veg Management

5 (2)

9 (1)

Google Earth or Maps

6.7 (3)

HATS Internal reference library

8 (1)

9 (1)

FS Mobile invasives

6 (1)

6 (1)

GAIA pro

7.5 (2)

ID Weeds (Univ. of Missouri)

6.5 (2)

Idaho Wildflowers

7.5 (2)

 

 

 

 

OnX Hunt app

 

9 (2)

 

 

 

Tank Mix Calculator

 

 

 

7.5 (2)

 

XID broadleaf weeds

7.5 (2)

AgTerra Spray Logger

7 (1)

BeeSmart

4 (1)

CA Soil Resources

8 (1)

Cal Flora

10 (1)

Colorado Flowers

5 (1)

Common Weeds of Utah

10 (1)

CyberTracker

9 (1)

E-DVIR

5 (1)

Federal Noxious Weeds Key

5 (1)

Fields Area Measure

8 (1)

GPS-Motion X

10 (1)

Garmins, Trimbel, QGIS

10 (1)

GIS Cloud

9 (1)

handyConversion

9 (1)

iBird Plus

9 (1)

IDFG Plant ID App

9 (1)

iGIS

10 (1)

iMapInvasives

3 (1)

iNaturalist

7 (1)

Kahoot

7 (1)

MachineryGuide

5 (1)

Mapout

6 (1)

Monsanto Weed ID

5 (1)

MT Weed.org

6 (1)

myGardenAnswers

5 (1)

My Radar

9 (1)

North American Wildflowers

7 (1)

ObserverPro

PlantNet

7 (1)

PlantSnap

4 (1)

RealCalc

9 (1)

SDNoxious Weeds

3 (1)

Soil Web

8 (1)

Sprayer Calibration Calculator

8 (1)

Trimble Terra Sync

7 (1)

WA Invasives WISC

9 (1)

Washington Plants by Flora ID

10 (1)

Web Soil Survey

9 (1)

weedalert.com

8 (1)

Wildflower

5 (1)

WindAlert by WeatherFlow

9 (1)

WSDA.iformbuilder.com

9 (1)

 

Comments on apps cited and reviewed by five or more respondents in the West are listed below by mobile app name. The average satisfaction rating and number of respondents/users is shown for each category. Apps are listed by number of respondents/users from highest to lowest.

 

EDDMapS, Includes Regional Versions (52)

Provides real-time tracking of invasive species occurrences; local and national distribution maps; electronic early detection reporting tools and a library of identification and management information.

EDDMapS West = 7.14 (35)

Plant ID = 6.5 (14)

1.     The app is fine, it's the operator that sometimes gets lost in the jungle of weed app technology.

2.     We've done extensive research & a questionnaire survey on noxious weed occurrence data collection & reporting tools and technologies. We selected EDDMapS as a result. It’s free. It is used across North American (internationally). It has written and photographic descriptions- links to USDA Plants Database and Bugwood. It allows real time data capture. It offers users a variety of ways to report weeds- which is the goal beyond just plant id. It drastically improves the ability for multiple entities to communicate and coordinate about weed issues. It allows users to hide private property reports. It provides users with multiple ways to download & query data. Other states are using it. It is ideal for reporting EDRR weeds for quick action. The UGA folks are monitoring reports and go out of their way to call managers when an invasive issue emerges. UGA is constantly improving their apps. A biocontrol app is included. Field managers can continue to use their existing system and still report weeds at no extra cost. The apps are easy to use- no GIS skills needed. The app allows anyone- our neighbors, youth, students, experts, citizen scientists, the ability to identify and report weeds!

3.     I am just getting started with it, so I have a learning curve to master before I can comment more accurately on it.

4.     The invasive plant ID function is fairly limited on the app (unless you are from Montana, in which case there is a built in Dichotomous Key). For all of the relevant Oregon and Washington invasive species on the app though, there multiple fairly high quality photos of each plant. This does drive up the size of the app but does help correctly identify/verify what plant you are seeing. It helps though if you already have an idea of what the plant you are looking at is. The scroll down species list, while thorough, includes a photo of each of the species which can help identify the plant you are looking at or at least suggest a potential plant entry which you can then open and look at other photos to see if it matches. Unfortunately, that initial species name photo is rather small which may make it difficult to correctly find the first species. The app also includes many species not relevant to the Pacific Northwest which further increases the size and makes it more difficult to find the initial plant species guess.

Survey / Mapping = 7.57 (21)

1.     I am just beginning to use this program, so I have a learning curve to master before I can comment more accurately on it.

2.     Not clear how agency gets the data.

3.     It's getting better, but you can't program it for your own project use. This means you can't specify certain categories - like patch size or infestation coverage except within the parameters of the app. It is nice to be able to quickly see where other infestations have been mapped across the state/country, but the level of detail collected just isn't there if you want to do fine-scale analysis.

4.     I would like to be able to see all my county info at one time instead of by specie and one point at a time.

5.     Although I mostly use our iForm/Collector app, I encourage others that do not have access to agency or other data collection/mapping apps to use EddMaps. Mostly outdoors people and groups like Master Gardeners, hunters, hikers, citizen scientists, etc.

6.     Although I mostly use our iForm/Collector app, I encourage others that do not have access to agency or other data collection/mapping apps to use EddMaps. Mostly outdoors people and groups like Master Gardeners, hunters, hikers, citizen scientists, etc.

7.     The surveying methodology is nice. You can use the app in areas without cell service by saving reports and uploading them once there is WIFI or cell phone service. You can do both polygon and point data, negative and positive sighting reports, and automatically records most of the information we need for our surveys. The sightings are also connected with a surveyor's account so you can directly contact the volunteer surveyor if there are any questions. The data is also part of a nation-wide database and it is easy to send verified sighting reports to program and land management partners for them to use the data to treat invasive species.
 The downside with the app though is there is an artificially restrictive limit on the number of volunteer hours it will record for each volunteer, treatment numbers, and you cannot fill out and assign survey records/sightings to a combined sighting report. Currently volunteers after surveys have to upload the sightings to their account, go online to the EDDMapS web page to fill out a report form, attach the individual records to the report, before sending it to the PNW-IPC (Pacific Northwest Invasive Plant Council) for review. The extra report step is more of an issue for our citizen science program for the PNW-IPC then a wide spread issue. Other groups I know who use the app to not face this issue since they are not in charge of their own project with EDDMapS. EDDMapS-West is best meant for programs you have dedicated and trained volunteers actively doing invasive species surveys. It is not meant as a general public app for random people to report suspicious plants in their or their neighbors' yards.

8.     The only additional feature I would like to see is the ability to view and download multiple species (points, lines & polygons) at once using their GUI. However, I can do that for point data using their Advanced Query tool.

EDDMapS-Unspecified version = 7.4 (11)

Plant ID = 7.8 (5)

1.     Local plants.

2.     I rarely use it.

3.     I use occasionally. Seems ok.

Survey / Mapping = 7 (6)

1.     Still learning so I cannot give a full report.

2.     Broadbased. OK nationally, but need more local refinement. We have a county GIS guy we rely on more.

EDDMapS West + PRO = 8.75 (4)

Plant ID use = 10 (1)

1.     The EDDMapS West has been developed for anyone to use and has a complete list of noxious weeds specific to Montana and EDDMapS PRO will be available soon for specifically for County Weed Districts and Agencies to use.

Survey / Mapping use = 7.5 (2)

1.     This one is pretty new so I have not played with it much yet.

Management 10 (1)

1.     These APPs can do it all.

EDDMapS – WA Invasives: Plant ID and Survey = 7 (2)

1.     This is a more user friendly version of the EDDMapS-West app focused solely on WA invasive species. It’s a smaller app due to being just Washington focused and only a single photo of each plant. The single photo is a downside since there are fewer photos to compare live plants too. On the other hand, the user scrolling interface for finding species is much better than the EDDMapS-West app due to larger photos by the species names. However since our program covers both Oregon and Washington we can't recommend it to our Oregon volunteers.

2.     I like the easy to use interface but it only takes point data, doesn't have entry fields for the other data the PNW-IPC cares about, volunteers are unable to send reports to our project in EDDMapS so we are unable to review them or are able to send the sightings to our partners. This app is great choice for general users or people who only have the occasional invasive species to report and not a good choice if you are trying to do large scale invasive species surveys.

Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) Family of Apps: (34)

ESRI is a supplier of geographic information system software, web GIS and geodatabase management applications used for survey/mapping and spatial data analytics. The majority of respondents listed survey/mapping as the primary use of these apps. Several comments in other categories were combined into the survey/mapping for this summary since this is the primary purpose of this family of apps.

ArcGIS Collector: Survey / Mapping = 7.7 (24)

1.     Professional quality, customizable data collection, steep learning curve.

2.     Still learning the app. Haven't used much yet.

3.     This app is very useful in the field, including the ability to use it offline. It is cumbersome to get the maps set up however.

4.     This is run through our federal database and it is not seamless and the UI is unfriendly, clunky and often crashes, but it is geared more towards surveying infestations and treatments.

5.     Works great. Looking forward to ArcGIS Aurora. Field validation and expressions will be helpful. Downsides are working with related tables. Nested tables are difficult to access. Other downside is that you need to be a named user to use. Not really available to the public.

6.     Good for more complex surveys requiring a variety of data points. Limited in editing functionality on hand-held devices. Need to use ArcGIS online or desktop applications to create forms and change appearances of map.

7.     The data collection dictionaries are customizable, so you can have separate dictionaries for distinct projects. However, they are not customizable within the app itself, so you have to use it in conjunction with ArcMap and/or ArcGIS online. I like that you can easily map with points, lines, or polygons. The background imagery can be updated real-time if you are mapping in an area where you have cellular service, or with a wifi hotspot device; or, if you'll be in an area without service you can upload imagery of where you'll be working, still collect data, and have it sync up when you return back to an area with data/wifi service. The GPS accuracy is only as accurate as the built-in GPS of the device you are using.

8.     ESRI product - support not the best. User has to create all tables and data.

9.     It needs a lot of setup prior to field work. Still trying to transition to it.

10.   Been having difficulties with off-line editing. Otherwise, ability to add/customize features is good. Easy to use in field and in office.

11.   Takes a little bit to set the maps and layers up, but once built it is an incredible app to collect point, polygons, and lines with.

12.   We are still in the development stage with iCollector, haven't field tested it yet.

13.   Great for mapping weeds, has all the right capabilities

ArcGIS Unspecified: Survey / Mapping = 6.67 (3)

1.     The basic license is not adequate for statewide database management. Our program won't purchase the Standard or Professional license. Hence, I have to use Python, QGIS and PostgreSQL to do big data processing.

2.     App discontinued in 2015 but old versions still work.

ArcGIS Survey 123: Survey / Mapping = 8.67 (3)

1.     Good for creating simple forms for collection of survey data. Program is easy to use, user does not need a lot of ArcMap experience. Data is geo-referenced and visible on interactive map. Functionality is limited with photo collection and form complexity.

2.     We needed lots of expertise and programming to develop and implement this.

ArcGIS Collector + iForm: Survey / Mapping = 8.5 (2)

1.     Works well as a stand alone, but nice if it interfaced with our database.

2.     Our internal GIS folks have modified these to work for us and our cooperators.

ArcGIS Explorer+Survey123: Survey / Mapping = 9 (1)

1.     Combining Explorer and Survey123 you can come up with a data collection system available to the public. Survey123 also supports data validation, related tables, and other useful functions. Currently developing this for the public and other partners to use for data collection. No sign in required. Works in browser or app.

ArcPad: Survey / Mapping = 8 (1)

1.     Requires understanding of GIS not very intuitive.

S1 with ArcMap: Treatment/Records = 6 (1)

1.     It helps with gathering information but the interface with ArcMap is not completely functional. For instance the mass uploading feature can be very picky on what it uploads. Usually this feature causes more problems than it fixes.

Montana Grasses: Plant ID = 8.6 (14)

The app provides images, species descriptions, range maps, and other information for more than 200 grasses and grass-like plants (graminoids) inhabiting the agricultural landscapes in Montana and adjacent states and provinces.

1.     Very helpful.

2.     Works well for me.

3.     Very good with regional and local grass photos and ID.

4.     Great photos with this app as well as identification specifics.

5.     EDDSMaps West is very skeletal and has limited value as an identification key. This id helps

6.     Very helpful app with great photos. Does not include every grass in Montana, but the included grasses are well covered. Includes many weedy grasses. Seems to be updated with more species quite frequently.

Avenza PDF Maps: Survey / Mapping = 7.6 (8); Other/Navigation = 9 (1)

Allows you to download maps for offline use on iOS or Android smartphone or tablet as well as on Windows 10 devices.

1.     Not used a bunch, but is helpful for determining locations and taking points. Points can be exported but I haven't used the app to that detail yet.

2.     It's a great way to collect data if you have a basemap. Mostly tracklogs and points. Can geotag photos with app.

3.     As a general mapping app it is great but not specific to surveying or plant management. The big drawback is the apps export ability. Hard to find the points or lines you want to export.

Fulcrum Mobile Solutions: Survey = 8.5 (6); Management = 8 (1)

Fulcrum is a mobile data collection platform that allows you to build mobile forms & collect data.

1.     I use it all the time and it's is integrated into our workflow and GIS.

2.     Can't load layers without cell service; importing maps/layers took a lot of work to figure out and requires a third mapping. service as an intermediary step to import from ArcMap into Fulcrum.

3.     Fulcrum is a very powerful and flexible database app. The possibilities are endless for an invasive plant manager.

Montana Wildflowers: Plant ID = 8.8 (7)

Can input plant information, such as its location, flower color and the time of year, the App will show which plants match your selections. 3,300 species of plants found in Montana.

1.     Very diagnostic and provides a personal plant log for time and place.

2.     Sometimes wish this app had more photos for some species.

3.     This app is free and is quite comprehensive. It does not have many search criteria, so the user does not often narrow their plant down to one plant, but it is helpful for getting close to an ID. This is the forb ID app I recommend the most right now.

MapItFast, AgTerra: Survey / Mapping = 7.5 (6)

Mapping software to map points, lines, areas and photos on Apples or Android devices.

1.     3rd party app from AgTerra. In the process of evaluating its utility for our Department, but it looks promising.

2.     Originally developed for pipeline and irrigation mapping. Hard to customize. Have to add all data for tables, etc...

3.     Simple, good customer service, additional options for application data processing. Annual/monthly fees based on user numbers.

4.     I'm not sure what I think about the downloading process.

5.     Excellent for data collection with or without data connection.

Colorado Noxious Weeds: Plant ID = 4.6 (5)

Lookup reference information and pictures of all the non-native, invasive species of weeds in Colorado.

1.     Can be used if not connected to the Internet.

2.     Great pictures, limited description and info about the weed.

Grass Snap, Univ. of Nebraska: Management = 8 (1); Monitoring = 7.2 (4)

Used for photo-monitoring. Rangeland managers can take repeatable photo-monitoring data, and save it to their smart device.

1.     Great for taking photos and comparing treatments through the years.

2.     Can't use unless connected to the Internet. Not sure about getting data off the web interface if there is one.

3.     Great monitoring tool.; We are currently working with i Collector to push our current weed locations into the phone, while still being able to add new locations and treatment information.

iForm (Zerion Corp): Plant ID = 10 (1),  Survey / Mapping = 9 (2)

iForm brings business grade, offline data collection to Android Device-was also reported with ESRI Collector

1.     iForm is a simple and easy method of mapping and tracking infestation.

 

Comments on apps listed and reviewed by four or fewer respondents/users are shown below within each category.

 

Plant Identification (primary use)

APP NAME (# OF RESPONDENTS)

RATING

COMMENTS

Flora of Yellowstone (4)

9.5

Love the search by plant name or characteristics. 2) A great quick reference guide for the Gallatin co. area; 3) Very helpful app, just needs more species.

Oregon Wildflowers (4)

8

I rarely use it; 2nd Easy for lay people to use. Very picture oriented.; 3rd Not specifically for weeds, and is lacking in several common species. Great for identifying a plant based on common characteristics.

Alaska Weeds ID (3)

8

Seems to work well for me; 2. Includes an interactive key; 3. Pictures do not save on my phone, and GPS accuracy is not 100%

HATS Internal Reference Library (ID/Survey both cited) (2)

8.5

We are in the first year of implementing HATS, mapping efforts are being coordinated with County weed boards; 2nd comment HATS is an iPad based system developed and used by the agency. Developed our own reference material based on regional distribution of species sorted by flower color.

ID Weeds (Univ. of Missouri) (2)

6.5

none

Idaho Wildflowers (2)

7.5

It is pretty basic (meant for everyone), but has been ok to use. You select a number of attributes and choose from the list of possibles. The pictures aren't always extremely diagnostic. This app costs a few dollars, but has a lot of plants, and good, quality pictures and information. It has a consistent format as well, which I appreciate.

XID broadleaf weeds (2)

7.5

This is a plant identification app

Cal Flora (1)

10

none

Colorado Flowers (1)

5

wish many apps covered more grasses, they all need more and better pictures, wish it could use GPS to determine location to filter possible plants

Common Weeds of Utah (1)

10

Great for many weeds lots of pictures of each plant; in the field, plant structure, root and seed head. The photos help to see different parts of the plants but this guide is for Utah plants, some cross over to Montana. They have a yard and garden section , common weeds section and noxious weed section. Great as a back up to Montana guides.

Federal Noxious Weeds Key (1)

5

I haven't really used it much

ID Dept F&G Plant ID App (1)

9

Much more comprehensive in the selectable attributes than the Wildflowers of ID app, but also geared more toward professional use. It takes a bit of getting used and you need to remember more about plant structures than with the basic app.

iNaturalist (1)

7

none

Monsanto Weed ID (1)

6

none

MT Weed.org (1)

7

none

North American Wildflowers (1)

7

none

PlantNet (1)

4

none

PlantSnap (1)

4

Has not been very accurate especially with regards to id of native plants

SDNoxious Weeds (1)

3

It's no longer supported in the new IOS operating system

WA Invasives WISC (1)

9

The goal of this mobile app is to make species identification easier and help improve detection and reporting of harmful invasive species statewide

Washington Plants by Flora ID (1)

10

The most comprehensive app. Must have botanical skills to use effectively

weedalert.com (1)

8

none

Wildflower (1)

5

none

WindAlert by WeatherFlow (1)

I have the WeatherFlow pocket-sized anemometer that I plug into the headphone output to view and record wind speed. I have also signed up for one of WeatherFlow's new smart weatherstations.

WSDA.iformbuilder.com (1)

9

This app is local to our state through Washington State Department of Agriculture. I use this one quite a bit during weed season. Pics, plant id, growth stage, location.

 

Survey / Mapping (Primary use)

APP NAME (# OF RESPONDENTS)

RATING

COMMENTS

iBioControl (bugwood.org)

ID/Survey/Management all cited (4)

8

Good reference info and connection to EDDMaps; 2nd comment: Helped with my learning curve and a great quick reference for release, observations, negative reporting, weed reporting. How current is kept?

Google Earth or Maps (3)

6.7

I use this when desperate to mark a point in the field, as I have not yet found or trained up on a better, more robust app (but I would like to).

FS Mobile Invasives (2)

ID/Survey both cited

6

No real Plant ID app involved; just a blank for plant code.; 2nd comment: Allows for spatial link (point, line, or polygon)

GAIA Pro (2)

7.5

Not very efficient but it works; 2nd comment: Very useful to make sure my crew covers the whole area and don't miss any areas.

OnX Hunt (2)

9

I use this app every day that I'm in the field. A detailed weed map can be made showing ownership and property boundaries with a screenshot on a Galaxy Note,

AgTerra Spray Logger (1)

7

none

CyberTracker (1)

9

Fully customizable app development software. Haven't built a weed app, but use it for other purposes.

Fields Area Measure (1)

8

I can map out distances in feet or yards and store them.

GPS-Motion X (1)

10

 iphone app that will record tracks, mark waypoints, store photos with waypoints, access maps and more. Easy to use.

Garmins, Trimbel, QGIS (1)

10

I personally prefer this method because I am an expert GIS user. However, the cost of ESRI's and Trimbles are way too high for local governments and excludes the public and others from reporting accurate weed locations, sizes and populations. Thus, to get other people to collect accurate geospatial noxious weed data using other tools is not reasonable. Garmins are adequate but it requires the user to hand type in a unique id for each report, tracks are poorly recorded. Data has to be exported and then imported using some other system. Trimbles require post processing and data dictionary set up- even more exclusive. Software costs are expensive. Lots of our weed managers are using AgTerra Map it Fast with Strider form but that requires data dictionary creation and many of our managers do not have those skill sets. Thus they get frustrated, confused and don't collect the information. I created a Strider Form that is EDDMapS ready for our managers to use. After seeing EDDMaps though, most decided to switch from AgTerra to EDDMaps.

GIS Cloud (1)

9

Great app for making your own templates. Easy to use. Easy to download data from web interface. Company is very helpful. Cons; pictures are downsized so not very good. I've only used the free version and you can only keep a limited amount of data. It is based out of the Czech Republic so not sure if that is okay with other organizations data policies.

iGIS (1)

10

none

Mapout (1)

6

none

Trimble Terra Sync (1)

7

none

Web Soil Survey (1)

9

Provides soils, plant communities (ESD), and various land use attributes and limitations

 

Management / Calibration and Other Apps

APP NAME (# OF RESPONDENTS)

RATING

COMMENTS

Bayer Veg Management

Management and Calibration (3)

6.3

We also have reference material on the File Library in HATS; 2. Mostly I use it as a reference vs. decision support

Tank Mix Calculator-Calibration (2)

7.5

Don't use it to much. It has some useful features. Provided free for any farmer to use on their mobile device to quickly and easily generate a tank mix.

HandyConversion-Calibration (1)

9

This is not truly a sprayer calibration app, but a conversion app which I use for many calculations and conversions.

RealCalc-Calibration (1)

9

I use RealCalc for math calculations. It is very useful to me.

Sprayer Calibration Calculator-Calibration (1)

8

none

myGardenAnswer-Management

5

none

ObserverPro-Records (1)

8

Use app to record treatment info - herbicide or mechanical and which herbicides used

BeeSmart-Other (1)

4

Pollinator Partnership. Add BMPs to avoid/minimize impacts from Pesticide use

CA Soil Resources-Other (1)

8

soil information

E-DVIR-Other (1)

5

use it to fill our driver timecards to fulfill DOT requirements. it's basic and simple, which is all we need. But could still work better.

iBird Plus-Other (1)

9

Use for ID birds while in the field.

Kahoot (1)

7

This is a polling app that I use in educational programs. I just started using it (yesterday) and was impressed, but I haven't fully explored its capabilities.

MachineryGuide-Other (1)

5

I'm currently experimenting with using apps for guidance.

My Radar-Other (1)

9

 Good for weather

Soil Web-Other (1)

8

Will ID the soil you are standing on and give some info about it

WindAlert by WeatherFlow-Other (1)

9

I have the WeatherFlow pocket-sized anemometer that I plug into the headphone output to view and record wind speed. I have also signed up for one of WeatherFlow's new smart weatherstations.

 

Resources cited that are not apps

Excel spreadsheet

Not an app, but often used webpage

//biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection.php

Haven't used this in a while. State of MT stopped supporting this. They defaulted to EDDmaps. Too Bad.

Invaders Database

Used occasionally. Pretty good. This was more of a website. Same difference to me.

USDA Plants Database

Not an app, but often used webpage

 

 

General Comments

1.     I'm on a County Weed Board, not a day to day weed fighter, am retired FS. I regretted the loss of Invaders database. Am not a real proponent of EDDmaps, even though the State financially supports it. I understand many States contribute data to EDDmaps but don't really use the app/database for on the ground management. I hear USDA Forest Service State and Private Forestry financially supports this University of Georgia program, but I don't think FS NFS (the management group of the FS) uses it.

2.     When designing mobile apps for invasive plant managers, the main questions become for whom is the app for and what do they want from it. Is the app meant for the general public or for trained volunteers or staff? Is it meant to be used for one off identification (i.e. someone submitting a photo of a suspicious plant in their yard or in the park) or is meant for large scale surveys such as full parcels or trail sections. The answers to these questions radically change how the mobile apps are designed and used. The app for the general public and only for occasional use may be very user friendly focus but can miss out on collecting key information for a land manager or grant applicant. Whereas a heavy duty survey app may be too daunting for the average user. Ideally a balance can be made between these different ideas but just remember a compromise between the two design ideas may result in an app too large for the average person to download on their phone or tablet devise.

3.     Will likely start using EDDMapS

4.     Very interested in seeing results.

5.     Hope help is coming. I'm in the RO and know field units use tablet apps

 


[1] TechLine Invasive Plant News, PO Box 1385 Helena MT  59624